Andrea Incontri is an Italian fashion designer who received his degree in architecture from the Politecnico di Milano. Not one to abandon his training as an architect, he applies to fashion the same design qualities based around shapes and surfaces, which have become his distinct signature and definitive style.

In 2010, won “Who Is On Next?”, a contest for up and coming talents organized by Vogue Italia. The first official recognition in the men’s division, this acknowledgement was only the first of many to come and pathed the way for a continued and successful collaboration with prestigious fashion magazine. Following shortly, Incontri was selected to represent the ‘Made in Italy’ at the first Vogue Experience fashion show in Dubai.
Since 2009, after his first apperance at Pitti, Incontri has become a staple name on the calendar of Milan Fashion Week, where he will show his fifth season this June.

His collections are based around the principal of garment functionality which blended together with his stylistic dna of pure lines, is dedicated to being Made in Italy and exhibits a meticulous technique of tailoring along with use of the highest quality materials.
Today, Andrea Incontri creates and markets his extensive brand of men’s and women’s ready-to-wear and accessories. In addition to his own line, he has an extensive resume in which he has collaborated with some of the top design houses such as Jil Sander, Missoni, Max Mara, Sergio Rossi, Jil Sander and Tod’s like mens creative director from 2014 to July 2019.

 
 
 
I’m a story teller of design, art and fashion.
My value are vision adding a sperimental design narrative transform it into a product.


Designer and Creative Director with almost twenty years’ experience in the design and fashion industry, with in-depth expertise in women’s and men’s ready-to-wear, leather goods, footwear and industrial design.

To me, a well thought-out design should be able to tell transversal story. Design means being keen on exploring new sceneries.
I believe that, in today’s world, a designer has to be able to imagine not only product itself, but also its desire-telling, how it is displayed physically and digitally, and the communication strategy around it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frederic Martin Bernard, Le Figaro - May 30, 2018
Named in 2014, the Italian designer of the male universe has won the trust of the house and operates a small revolution by launching the first loafers fabric.“Tod’s is an Italian family business and, at the same time, a brand with international influence that must meet the aspirations of the world. Today, I think to control the codes and the operation. I learned a lot from the teams. And vice versa. “In other words, the discreet Italian has managed, step by step, to gain confidence internally, when his more mediatized alter ego, on the feminine side, have failed to register in the long term.
Every morning, when a man turns to his dressing room, he is faced with a multitude of clothes that, in many cases, are not fundamentally different. However, he has the reflex to choose one more than another, because this piece is perfect in his eyes, modern without being extravagant, of great quality. I am working on this idea of updating the timeless of the male dressing room at Tod’s. My approach is softer than that of a pure stylist.
Guy Trebay, The New York Times - September 23, 2017
Mr. Incontri, 46, is creative director of men’s wear at the Italian luxury group Tod’s, best known for its bobble-bottom Gommino driving loafer. Hired in 2014 to help expand and evolve Tod’s offerings — primarily shoes and men’s wear — Mr. Incontri has quietly gone on to carve out a singular niche among contemporary Italian designers.
“Milan is in a kind of magic moment right now,” Mr. Incontri said as Luisa Pisano, the events director at the small theater, conducted us around its gilded loges, its damask-lined boxes and past ranks of chairs of Lilliputian proportions. “Yes, in a way, all this is reminiscent of an old and classical Italy, and maybe that’s a little bit stereotypical,” Mr. Incontri said a bit later, before getting back on his Vespa and heading home. “But in an Instagram age, when we’re all constantly receiving an overdose of images and messages, these old-fashioned things, with their deep sense of humanity, feel more important than ever.”
Guy Trebay, The New York Times – June 24, 2016
Andrea Incontri is another of the unsung and gifted journeyman designers now at work (one is tempted here to cite, too, Maria Grazia Chiuri, the untemperamental Valentino designer who reportedly is to be tapped as the first woman designer at Dior). For the past several years Mr. Incontri, a trained architect, has been producing men’s wear for Tod’s, the family-owned Italian leather-goods house based in that country’s Marche region and best known for its gommino shoes.
Tod’s presentation, held last week in a pavilion set up over the tennis court at the Villa Necchi Campiglio in Milan, involved a series of tableaux vivants reminiscent of the images of elegant locals, mainly nobles, photographed for “Italian Portraits,” a volume commissioned some years ago by Diego Della Valle, chairman and owner of Tod’s Group. Translated, those images embodied the aspirational consumer whom Tod’s as a brand lays claim to, and for whom Mr. Incontri implicitly designs.
Suzy Menkes, vogue.in – January 23, 2015
The ornate grotto and historical frescoes at the Palazzo Corsini in Florence threatened to outshine Andrea Incontri’s simple lines – but that was doubtless the point: to contrast streamlined modernity with baroque complications. Even as the models walked the runway at speed in functional outfits – but stylish footwear – I thought (beyond the din of wild music) that there was some sophisticated work. Maybe it is the designer’s background in Mantua that makes him so sensitive to texture, comparing the raw and the refined.
It was a smart meld of past grandeur with the sleekness of the twenty-first century.
Anna Wintour, interviewed by MFF – September 19, 2013
“I really like this new Cnmi (National Chamber for Italian Fashion) class, far more imposing. I was struck by the air full of excitement that can be breathed in the city, with a multitude of interesting events”, she stated, not forgetting to pay tribute to the young names of this Milan women’s fashion week. “Who do I love of this new generation of Italian designers? Fausto Puglisi, Andrea Incontri, Marco De Vincenzo, Delfina Delettrez or Alessandra Facchinetti”, she added, explaining that now is the time of young designers.
Andrea Incontri is an Italian fashion designer who received his degree in architecture from the Politecnico di Milano. Not one to abandon his training as an architect, he applies to fashion the same design qualities based around shapes and surfaces, which have become his distinct signature and definitive style.

In 2010, won “Who Is On Next?”, a contest for up and coming talents organized by Vogue Italia. The first official recognition in the men’s division, this acknowledgement was only the first of many to come and pathed the way for a continued and successful collaboration with prestigious fashion magazine. Following shortly, Incontri was selected to represent the ‘Made in Italy’ at the first Vogue Experience fashion show in Dubai.
Since 2009, after his first apperance at Pitti, Incontri has become a staple name on the calendar of Milan Fashion Week, where he will show his fifth season this June.

His collections are based around the principal of garment functionality which blended together with his stylistic dna of pure lines, is dedicated to being Made in Italy and exhibits a meticulous technique of tailoring along with use of the highest quality materials.
Today, Andrea Incontri creates and markets his extensive brand of men’s and women’s ready-to-wear and accessories. In addition to his own line, he has an extensive resume in which he has collaborated with some of the top design houses such as Jil Sander, Missoni, Max Mara, Sergio Rossi, Jil Sander and Tod’s like mens creative director from 2014 to July 2019.

 
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I’m a story teller of design, art and fashion.
My value are vision adding a sperimental design narrative transform it into a product.


Designer and Creative Director with almost twenty years’ experience in the design and fashion industry, with in-depth expertise in women’s and men’s ready-to-wear, leather goods, footwear and industrial design.

To me, a well thought-out design should be able to tell transversal story. Design means being keen on exploring new sceneries.
I believe that, in today’s world, a designer has to be able to imagine not only product itself, but also its desire-telling, how it is displayed physically and digitally, and the communication strategy around it.
 
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Frederic Martin Bernard, Le Figaro - May 30, 2018
Named in 2014, the Italian designer of the male universe has won the trust of the house and operates a small revolution by launching the first loafers fabric.“Tod’s is an Italian family business and, at the same time, a brand with international influence that must meet the aspirations of the world. Today, I think to control the codes and the operation. I learned a lot from the teams. And vice versa. “In other words, the discreet Italian has managed, step by step, to gain confidence internally, when his more mediatized alter ego, on the feminine side, have failed to register in the long term.
Every morning, when a man turns to his dressing room, he is faced with a multitude of clothes that, in many cases, are not fundamentally different. However, he has the reflex to choose one more than another, because this piece is perfect in his eyes, modern without being extravagant, of great quality. I am working on this idea of updating the timeless of the male dressing room at Tod’s. My approach is softer than that of a pure stylist.
Guy Trebay, The New York Times - September 23, 2017
Mr. Incontri, 46, is creative director of men’s wear at the Italian luxury group Tod’s, best known for its bobble-bottom Gommino driving loafer. Hired in 2014 to help expand and evolve Tod’s offerings — primarily shoes and men’s wear — Mr. Incontri has quietly gone on to carve out a singular niche among contemporary Italian designers.
“Milan is in a kind of magic moment right now,” Mr. Incontri said as Luisa Pisano, the events director at the small theater, conducted us around its gilded loges, its damask-lined boxes and past ranks of chairs of Lilliputian proportions. “Yes, in a way, all this is reminiscent of an old and classical Italy, and maybe that’s a little bit stereotypical,” Mr. Incontri said a bit later, before getting back on his Vespa and heading home. “But in an Instagram age, when we’re all constantly receiving an overdose of images and messages, these old-fashioned things, with their deep sense of humanity, feel more important than ever.”
Guy Trebay, The New York Times – June 24, 2016
Andrea Incontri is another of the unsung and gifted journeyman designers now at work (one is tempted here to cite, too, Maria Grazia Chiuri, the untemperamental Valentino designer who reportedly is to be tapped as the first woman designer at Dior). For the past several years Mr. Incontri, a trained architect, has been producing men’s wear for Tod’s, the family-owned Italian leather-goods house based in that country’s Marche region and best known for its gommino shoes.
Tod’s presentation, held last week in a pavilion set up over the tennis court at the Villa Necchi Campiglio in Milan, involved a series of tableaux vivants reminiscent of the images of elegant locals, mainly nobles, photographed for “Italian Portraits,” a volume commissioned some years ago by Diego Della Valle, chairman and owner of Tod’s Group. Translated, those images embodied the aspirational consumer whom Tod’s as a brand lays claim to, and for whom Mr. Incontri implicitly designs.
Suzy Menkes, vogue.in – January 23, 2015
The ornate grotto and historical frescoes at the Palazzo Corsini in Florence threatened to outshine Andrea Incontri’s simple lines – but that was doubtless the point: to contrast streamlined modernity with baroque complications. Even as the models walked the runway at speed in functional outfits – but stylish footwear – I thought (beyond the din of wild music) that there was some sophisticated work. Maybe it is the designer’s background in Mantua that makes him so sensitive to texture, comparing the raw and the refined.
It was a smart meld of past grandeur with the sleekness of the twenty-first century.
Anna Wintour, interviewed by MFF – September 19, 2013
“I really like this new Cnmi (National Chamber for Italian Fashion) class, far more imposing. I was struck by the air full of excitement that can be breathed in the city, with a multitude of interesting events”, she stated, not forgetting to pay tribute to the young names of this Milan women’s fashion week. “Who do I love of this new generation of Italian designers? Fausto Puglisi, Andrea Incontri, Marco De Vincenzo, Delfina Delettrez or Alessandra Facchinetti”, she added, explaining that now is the time of young designers.